Medical, News, Uncategorized

Immunomodulatory and Antidiabetic Effects of a New Herbal Preparation (HemoHIM)

Angelica gigas Nakai, Cnidium officinale Makino, and Paeonia japonica Miyabe) was developed to protect immune, hematopoietic, and self-renewal tissues against radiation.

This study determined whether or not HemoHIM could alter hyperglycemia and the immune response in diabetic mice.

Both nondiabetic and diabetic mice were orally administered HemoHIM (100 mg/kg) once a day for 4 weeks. Diabetes was induced by single injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 200 mg/kg, i.p.).

In diabetic mice, HemoHIM effectively improved hyperglycemia and glucose tolerance compared to the diabetic control group as well as elevated plasma insulin levels with preservation of insulin staining in pancreatic β-cells.

HemoHIM treatment restored thymus weight, white blood cells, lymphocyte numbers, and splenic lymphocyte populations (CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T), which were reduced in diabetic mice, as well as IFN-γ production in response to Con A stimulation.

These results indicate that HemoHIM may have potential as a glucose-lowering and immunomodulatory agent by enhancing the immune function of pancreatic β-cells in STZ-induced diabetic mice.

Resources:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/25045390/?i=3&from=hemohim

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Health Care, Medical, News, Products, Uncategorized

HemoHIM, a herbal preparation, alleviates airway inflammation

HemoHIM, a herbal preparation, alleviates airway inflammation caused by cigarette smoke and lipopolysaccharide.

HemoHIM, herbal preparation has designed for immune system recovery.

We investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of HemoHIM on cigarette smoke (CS) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mouse model.

To induce COPD, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to CS for 1 h per day (eight cigarettes per day) for 4 weeks and intranasally received LPS on day 26. HemoHIM was administrated to mice at a dose of 50 or 100 mg/kg 1h before CS exposure.

HemoHIM reduced the inflammatory cell count and levels of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β in the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) induced by CS+LPS exposure. HemoHIM decreased the inflammatory cell infiltration in the airway and inhibited the expression of iNOS and MMP-9 and phosphorylation of Erk in lung tissue exposed to CS+LPS.

In summary, our results indicate that HemoHIM inhibited a reduction in the lung inflammatory response on CS and LPS induced lung inflammation via the Erk pathway. Therefore, we suggest that HemoHIM has the potential to treat pulmonary inflammatory disease such as COPD.

Resources:

Shin NR, et al. Lab Anim Res. 2017.
Authors

Author information

1
College of Veterinary Medicine (BK21 Plus Project Team), Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Korea.
2
Natural Product Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Jeongeup, Korea.

Citation

Lab Anim Res. 2017 Mar;33(1):40-47. doi: 10.5625/lar.2017.33.1.40. Epub 2017 Mar 27.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5385281/

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Medical, News

Symptoms and Causes of Poor Circulation

poor-blood-circulation

Overview

Your body’s circulation system is responsible for sending blood, oxygen, and nutrients throughout your body. When blood flow to a specific part of your body is reduced, you may experience the symptoms of poor circulation. Poor circulation is most common in your extremities, such as your legs and arms.

Poor circulation isn’t a condition in itself. Instead, it results from other health issues. Therefore, it’s important to treat the underlying causes, rather than just the symptoms. Several conditions can lead to poor circulation. The most common causes include obesity, diabetes, heart conditions, and arterial issues.

Symptoms of poor circulation

The most common symptoms of poor circulation include:

  • tingling.
  • numbness.
  • throbbing or stinging pain in your limbs.
  • pain.
  • muscle cramps.

Each condition that might lead to poor circulation can also cause unique symptoms. For example, people with peripheral artery disease may have erectile dysfunction along with typical pain, numbness, and tingling.

Causes of poor circulation

There are several different causes of poor circulation.

Peripheral artery disease

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can lead to poor circulation in your legs. PAD is a circulatory condition that causes narrowing of the blood vessels and arteries. In an associated condition called atherosclerosis, arteries stiffen due to plaque buildup in the arteries and blood vessels. Both conditions decrease blood flow to your extremities and can result in pain.

Over time, reduced blood flow in your extremities can cause:

  • numbness
  • tingling
  • nerve damage
  • tissue damage

If left untreated, reduced blood flow and plaque in your carotid arteries may result in a stroke. Your carotid arteries are the major blood vessels that deliver blood to your brain. If plaque buildup takes place in the arteries in your heart, you’re at risk of having a heart attack.

PAD is most common in adults over age 50, but it can also occur in younger people. People who smoke are at a higher risk for developing PAD early in life.

Blood clots

Blood clots block the flow of blood, either partially or entirely. They can develop almost anywhere in your body, but a blood clot that develops in your arms or legs can lead to circulation problems.

Blood clots can develop for a variety of reasons, and they can be dangerous. If a blood clot in your leg breaks away, it can pass through other parts of your body, including your heart or lungs. It may also lead to a stroke. When this happens, the results may be serious, or even deadly. If discovered before it causes a larger problem, a blood clot can often be treated successfully.

Varicose veins

Varicose veins are enlarged veins caused by valve failure. The veins appear gnarled and engorged, and they’re most often found on the back of the legs. The damaged veins can’t move blood as efficiently as other veins, so poor circulation may become a problem. Although rare, varicose veins can also cause blood clots.

Your genes largely determine whether or not you’ll develop varicose veins. If a relative has varicose veins, your risk is higher. Women are also more likely to develop them, as are people who are overweight or obese.

Diabetes

You may think diabetes only affects your blood sugar, but it can also cause poor circulation in certain areas of your body. This includes cramping in your legs, as well as pain in your calves, thighs, or buttocks. This cramping may be especially bad when you’re physically active. People with advanced diabetes may have difficulty detecting the signs of poor circulation. This is because diabetic neuropathy can cause reduced sensation in the extremities.

Diabetes can also cause heart and blood vessel problems. People with diabetes are at an increased risk for atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, and heart disease.

Obesity

Carrying around extra pounds puts a burden on your body. If you’re overweight, sitting or standing for hours may lead to circulation problems.

Being overweight or obese also puts you at an increased risk for many other causes of poor circulation, including varicose veins and blood vessel problems.

Raynaud’s disease

People who experience chronic cold hands and feet may have a condition called Raynaud’s disease. This disease causes the small arteries in your hands and toes to narrow. Narrowed arteries are less capable of moving blood through your body, so you may begin experiencing symptoms of poor circulation. The symptoms of Raynaud’s disease commonly occur when you’re in cold temperatures or feeling unusually stressed.

Other areas of your body can be affected besides your fingers and toes. Some people will have symptoms in their lips, nose, nipples, and ears.

Women are more likely to develop Raynaud’s disease. Also, people who live in colder climates are more likely to have it.

Diagnosing poor circulation

Since poor circulation is symptomatic of numerous conditions, diagnosing the condition will help your doctor diagnose the symptoms. It’s important to first disclose any known family history of poor circulation and any related diseases. This can help your doctor better assess your risk factors, as well as determine which diagnostic tests are most appropriate.

Aside from a physical exam to detect pain and swelling, your doctor may order:

an antibodies blood test to detect inflammatory conditions, such as Raynaud’s disease
a blood sugar test for diabetes
blood testing to look for high levels of D dimer in the case of a blood clot
an ultrasound or CT scan
blood pressure tests including testing of the legs

Treating poor circulation

Treatment for poor circulation depends on the condition causing it. Methods may include:

compression socks for painful, swollen legs
special exercise program recommended by your doctor to increase circulation
insulin for diabetes
laser or endoscopic vein surgery for varicose veins
Medications may include clot-dissolving drugs, as well as blood-thinners depending on your condition. Alpha blockers and calcium channel blockers are used to treat Raynaud’s disease.

What is the outlook?

You should discuss possible symptoms of poor circulation with your doctor. If you’re having uncomfortable symptoms, they may signal an underlying condition. Untreated conditions can lead to serious complications. Your doctor will work to determine the cause of your poor circulation and treat the underlying issue.

When caught early, diseases that lead to poor circulation are treatable. Left untreated, poor circulation may indicate a disease is in a progressive state. Life-threatening complications, such as loose blood clots, can also occur if the condition is not properly treated. Work with your doctor to start a comprehensive treatment plan that also includes a healthy lifestyle.

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Hemohim Can Be The Solution

 

Medical, News

– Topic Overview

What is giant cell arteritis?

Giant-Cell-ArteritisGiant cell arteritis (say “ar-tuh-RY-tus”), or GCA, is inflammation of the blood vessels. It mostly affects the arteries that carry blood to the head, especially those that supply the eyes, temple, and jaw. Because it often affects the arteryin the temple, it is also called temporal arteritis.

People who have giant cell arteritis need to be treated right away. That’s because it can cause loss of vision and may lead to a stroke or mini-strokes.

Some people who have giant cell arteritis also have polymyalgia rheumatica. This is another inflammatory condition that affects the muscles. It causes pain and stiffness in the hip, neck, or shoulder area. The same medicines are used to treat both conditions.

What causes giant cell arteritis?

Experts don’t fully understand what causes it. It may be that the immune system is attacking the body’s own tissues. Your genes may play a role in this. For example, people whose ancestors are from Scandinavia or Northern Europe are more likely to have this problem.

Giant cell arteritis occurs in women more often than men. It is more common as people get older.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms may start either suddenly or slowly. They may include:

  • A new headache, often near the temple or around the eye. This is the most common symptom.
  • Pain in the jaw, especially when you chew.
  • Vision problems such as double vision or brief loss of vision.
  • Tenderness on the side of the head or scalp. The blood vessel on the temple camera.gif may look swollen. And it may hurt to wear glasses or comb your hair.

How is giant cell arteritis diagnosed?

Your doctor will do a physical exam and ask you about your symptoms and past health. For example, the doctor may look for arteries on the temple or forehead that are swollen, lumpy, or tender. This is a sign of giant cell arteritis.

The doctor will also consider your age in diagnosing this condition. People younger than 50 very rarely have giant cell arteritis.

The doctor may order tests too. These may include:

  • Blood tests such as sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein. These tests can show if you have inflammation in your body.
  • Complete blood count. This test can show if you have anemia, which is common in people who have giant cell arteritis.
  • Temporal artery biopsy. For this test, a surgeon takes a small tissue sample from a blood vessel in your temple and checks it for inflammation.

Some other conditions can cause similar symptoms. Your doctor may also do tests to rule out those conditions, which include arthritis and hypothyroidism.

How is it treated?

Giant cell arteritis is treated with steroid medicines, which reduce inflammation. Giant cell arteritis is dangerous because it can cause serious problems, such as stroke or blindness. So your doctor may start you on the medicine right away, even before the diagnosis is confirmed.

You’ll probably feel better in a day or two after you start the medicine. Most of the time, symptoms improve quickly and go away 2 to 4 weeks after treatment starts. But you may need to keep taking steroid medicine for 1 to 2 years or even longer. This helps to keep your symptoms from coming back.

Long-term treatment with steroid medicine will put you at risk for bone thinning (osteoporosis). This is because steroid medicines reduce how well your body takes in calcium, which is important in building strong bones. Your doctor may recommend a bone density test to see if you need to take a medicine to prevent osteoporosis. These medicines are called bisphosphonates. Or your doctor may simply start you on the medicine without the test.

HemoHIM is to increase the number of immunocytes or enhance their functions, and help destroy harmful pathogens and distorted cells, to reduce unwanted immune reactions
Medical, News

What Are Autoimmune Disorders?

Immune system disorders cause abnormally low activity or over activity of the immune system. In cases of immune system over activity, the body attacks and damages its own tissues (autoimmune diseases). Immune deficiency diseases decrease the body’s ability to fight invaders, causing vulnerability to infections.

In response to an unknown trigger, the immune system may begin producing antibodies that instead of fighting infections, attack the body’s own tissues. Treatment for autoimmune diseases generally focuses on reducing immune system activity. Examples of autoimmune diseases include:
  • Rheumatoid arthritis. The immune system produces antibodies that attach to the linings of joints. Immune system cells then attack the joints, causing inflammation, swelling, and pain. If untreated, rheumatoid arthritis causes gradually causes permanent joint damage. Treatments for rheumatoid arthritis can include various oral or injectable medications that reduce immune system over activity.
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus). People with lupus develop autoimmune antibodies that can attach to tissues throughout the body. The joints, lungs, blood cells, nerves, and kidneys are commonly affected in lupus. Treatment often requires daily oral prednisone, a steroid that reduces immune system function.
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The immune system attacks the lining of the intestines, causing episodes of diarrhearectal bleeding, urgent bowel movements, abdominal pain, fever, and weight loss. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are the two major forms of IBD. Oral and injected immune-suppressing medicines can treat IBD.
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS). The immune system attacks nerve cells, causing symptoms that can include pain, blindness, weakness, poor coordination, and muscle spasms. Various medicines that suppress the immune system can be used to treat multiple sclerosis.
  • Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Immune system antibodies attack and destroy insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. By young adulthood, people with type 1 diabetes require insulin injections to survive.
  • Guillain-Barre syndrome. The immune system attacks the nerves controlling muscles in the legs and sometimes the arms and upper body. Weakness results, which can sometimes be severe. Filtering the blood with a procedure called plasmapheresis is the main treatment for Guillain-Barre syndrome.
  • Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Similar to Guillian-Barre, the immune system also attacks the nerves in CIDP, but symptoms last much longer. About 30% of patients can become confined to a wheelchair if not diagnosed and treated early. Treatment for CIDP and GBS are essentially the same.
  • Psoriasis. In psoriasis, overactive immune system blood cellscalled T-cells collect in the skin. The immune system activity stimulates skin cells to reproduce rapidly, producing silvery, scaly plaques on the skin.
  • Graves’ disease. The immune system produces antibodies that stimulate the thyroid gland to release excess amounts of thyroidhormone into the blood (hyperthyroidism). Symptoms of Graves’ disease can include bulging eyes as well as weight loss, nervousness, irritability, rapid heart rate, weakness, and brittle hair. Destruction or removal of the thyroid gland, using medicines or surgery, is usually required to treat Graves’ disease.
  • Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Antibodies produced by the immune system attack the thyroid gland, slowly destroying the cells that produce thyroid hormone. Low levels of thyroid hormone develop (hypothyroidism), usually over months to years. Symptoms include fatigue, constipation, weight gain, depression, dry skin, and sensitivity to cold. Taking a daily oral synthetic thyroid hormone pill restores normal body functions.
  • Myasthenia gravis. Antibodies bind to nerves and make them unable to stimulate muscles properly. Weakness that gets worse with activity is the main symptom of myasthenia gravis. Mestinon (pyridostigmine) is the main medicine used to treat myasthenia gravis.
  • Vasculitis. The immune system attacks and damages blood vessels in this group of autoimmune diseases. Vasculitis can affect any organ, so symptoms vary widely and can occur almost anywhere in the body. Treatment includes reducing immune system activity, usually with prednisone or another corticosteroid.
HemoHIM is to increase the number of immunocytes or enhance their functions, and help destroy harmful pathogens and distorted cells, to reduce unwanted immune reactions